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Try These Sports for the Child with ADHD

Certain sports are better suited for the ADHD child than others. Baseball, for example, is usually not a good choice. The slow pace and the need for well-developed motor and eye-hand coordination skills make it difficult for many children with ADHD .Stuck in left field, the ADHD child is likely to be off chasing a butterfly when the fly ball comes whizzing his direction.

Some of the more suitable sports for the ADHD child are:

Soccer. Soccer serves as a good building block for other sports because it enhances speed, endurance, and leg strength. It is relatively safe. Too, the hyperactive child does not look much different form other children on the field. Most communities have summer and fall soccer programs and communities in warmer climates have soccer programs year-round. Most children genuinely enjoy soccer; it is now the second largest sport for children in the United States.

Swimming. Swimming, with or without competition, is a good choice for many children with ADHD. The explosiveness of swimming is well matched to the impulsiveness of ADHD. Being a solitary sport, it does not require close cooperation with a large number of teammates as is necessary in the more traditional team sports.

Also swimming is an excellent activity for children with coordination problems. Motor skills needed for swimming seem to be different from those needed for activities on land; a clumsy child can actually be a good swimmer. Swimming, too, seems to enhance over all motor coordination. I have know many ADHD children who were able to experience success in competitive swimming when they failed at all other sports.

Karate. Tae Kwon Do and Karate have proven effective outlets for many ADHD children. Such martial arts are probably the most enjoyable sport after soccer.

Parents sometimes question this use of the martial arts fearing that they may over-stimulate the child or aggravate aggressiveness creating serious social problems. But this does not seem to happen.  The martial arts like tae kwon do and karate are two of the most therapeutic programs for children with  focus and organizational problems. Another benefit is that children can start as young as 6 or 7 years of age. These sports are beneficial because they involve structure, rules, rituals, a stop-and-think attitude. No techniques are taught until the child has learned to stop, listen and think. Classes are usually small. The techniques are monitored carefully, and it is emphasized over and over that these activities are sports and are not be used for any aggressive play. Students who disobey the rules are likely to be expelled from the class.

The martial arts teach and develop control of mind and body. Such control, of course, is the basic need of children with ADHD

The Place Of Sports In The Treatment Of ADHD

Jason was eight and really interested in sports. He also had ADHD. He was signed up for Little League Baseball and eagerly went to practices. Soon, however, his enthusiasm turned to frustration as he struck out, missed fly balls and sat on the bench a much of the time.

Early sport experiences for ADHD children all too often follow a similar pattern. The result is that they are turned off sports altogether. Such occurrences are unfortunate. Although little research exists to document the use of sports and recreation in children with ADHD, the experience of many people working with children suggests that, when used properly, they can make a significant contribution to the child’s overall growth and development.

Carefully chosen activities, perhaps combined with the use of appropriate medication, can enhance the child’s confidence, self-esteem, fitness, and social adjustment. While conventional treatment with medication, behavior modification and academic intervention are mainstays of management, children with ADHD need the physical, psychological and social benefits which sports and other recreational activities can provide.

Integrating recreation and sports into a management plan requires thoughtful planning. We are all familiar with “individual education plans”. ADHD children might well benefit from “individual recreation plans”. In selecting an activity for a child, various factors need to be considered: What are the child’s assets as far are coordination, body strength and attention? Why have previous sports activities failed? What are the child’s interests–what does he or she do in his free time? How mature is the child physically and emotionally.

Thus, it is important for the parents to talk to the coach or recreation leader about their child’s skills and problems before a program begins. Parents worry that this will create a negative attitude in the coach or teacher. On the contrary, most coaches want and need to know about strengths and weakness the child may have. If not made aware of the child’s needs, the coach will probably interpret his negative behaviors or inexperience as lack of interest or rebellion. The end result is a bad impression of the child.

A bonus coming from athletic activity is that as parents participate with the child, barriers are let down and more meaningful communication can occur. While attempts at dialogue at the dinner table may lag, spontaneous and meaningful conversation can usually be elicited while shooting baskets or playing a game of ping-pong.

Too many ADHD children have been turned off sports and physical recreational activities because of bad experiences in the past. These negative attitudes need to be turned around so that the child can enjoy the benefits of recreation and fitness activities. Carefully chosen activities can not only be pleasurable but provide significant therapeutic benefits to child with ADHD.

The next blog will outline the best sports for children with ADHD.

Positive Relationships Sets the Stage for Success

Our chance of success in parenting is greatly increased as we positively meet the normal, healthy needs of our children for love, acceptance, meaning, and mastery. As these needs are met our children will be less tempted to seek a place for themselves through deviant, undesirable behavior.

Our children need to know that we love them in spite of what they do. Our love and concern as parents is not conditioned on their behavior. By honestly accepting our children and liking them while not necessarily accepting or liking their behavior,  we keep the door open to change and growth. Love is, and has always been, the most powerful force in the world.

When it comes to relating to children, patience is a virtue but is not always easy to express.
“Stop acting like a child,” I overhead one frustrated mother say to her six-year-old. Although I could understand why this mother erupted in such frustration in the middle of the supermarket, her remark mirrors our frequent inappropriate expectations of our children. Much of the behavior of children that is so frustrating to us as adults is simply our children being, well, children.

To be effective as parents, we need to  Our love and concern as parents is not conditioned on the child’s behavior.have some idea of what is appropriate behavior for our children’s age and stage of development and not attack them for things they cannot help. A young father got very angry with his three-year-old son for using a paper cup as a football during a formal reception. Actually this was pretty normal behavior for a toddler who was ignored in the midst of all the adult activity.

Another mother was frustrated because her thirteen-year-old daughter ran to her room  slamming the door when her mother disapproved of the dress she was wearing. Actually, such pouting and anger are quite typical of the adolescent. We need to remember that children are uniquely children—growing organisms who have not yet reached perfection. Punishment of the child for things he or she cannot help or does not understand will only create frustration, confusion and, likely, rebellion.

We often use up so much energy nagging and correcting our children that we have little energy left to relate to them in positive ways. This is particularly true with ADHD children. In the happy families I have known, however, the interactions have a positive tone and direction. In angry, unhappy families, most interactions have a negative tone. This is one area where all of us as parents can work toward a better record. We can tip the balance in our families in a more positive direction by applying some of the following principles to our relationships:

Listen to the child. Listen without interrupting or correcting. Listen to just hear what he or she has to say.

Do something the child likes. For some this may be reading and talking, others playing touch football, others working on a craft project, or repairing the car.

Give the child some space. Let the child do his or her own thing as long as the activity does not infringe on the rights of others. We are saying, in essence, “I trust you to make some choices for yourself about what you will do with your time.”

Avoid conflict when possible. Conflict, at times and to some degree, is inevitable. While most parents seek to avoid conflict, some seem to delight in having a head on collision with their children. However, both parents and children gain when potential conflict is avoided. A power struggle only creates hostility and negative feelings which hurts everyone. When you do need to draw the line and establish a limit, do so firmly and quickly with as little verbal combat as possible.

Look for the child’s good points. Everyone has some gift. Everyone does something well. Everyone has some redeeming features. The sparkle is there if we only look for it. Ours will be a much happier family if we look for the other persons talents rather than their faults.

As parents we teach through relationships .

We show our children what love is by loving. We teach forgiveness by forgiving. We teach honesty by being honest. We cannot substitute things for affection. Often adults have been heard to say, “I received everything I needed form my parents except the love and understanding I needed most.”

The child with ADHD draws criticism and negative feedback like a magnet. Relationships in the family often mushroom into a back hole of negativism. Parents find themselves constantly correcting, redirecting, and limiting. The child too often responds in sullenness and more self-defeating behavior. It takes effort to reorient the family atmosphere to a more positive spin. But it can be done. And it is well worth the effort.

ADHD and Handwriting

Even in this day of thumb-driven Twitter shorthand, handwriting continues to be a critical skill. Legible, coherent handwriting is a signal measure of academic success. And it still plays an important role in formal and informal communication.

Educators and other professionals working with children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have observed that many of these children have significant problems with handwriting.

A recent study coming out of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) documents the relevance of these observations. This research, led by Slavica Katusic of the Mayo Clinic was published in Pediatrics (September, 2011).  The study included 6,000 children: all those born in Rochester Minnesota between 1976 and 1982 and who was still living there after age 5.

Katusic and her co-workers evaluated school and medical records to see which children showed signs of ADHD, as well as how well they performed on writing, reading and general intelligence tests over their school career. A total of 379 children fit the criteria for ADHD. About 800 children scored poorly on tests of writing abilities, and most with writing problems had reading difficulties as well.

Writing problems were much more common in both boys and girls with ADHD, with close to two-thirds of boys with ADHD having problems with writing. That compared to one in six of their peers without ADHD. In girls, 57 percent with ADHD had a writing problem, compared to less than 10 percent without ADHD.

There are several reasons why children with ADHD may have problems in writing. Writing is a very complex task that involves cognitive activity and motor activity at the same time. A high level of mental coordination and sequencing is required—tasks that individuals with ADHD have difficulty with. Also, memory and planning problems may affect the writing process. The impairment in sustained attention experienced by children with ADHD causes them to loose track of what they are doing and they will tend to make careless errors and get confused about what is to come next in the phrase or sentence.

Long term observation does suggest that the writing problems do get better with increasing maturity. Individual education plans that address some of those related difficulties can help especially if they’re started early.

It is my observation that when kids with ADHD are appropriately treated with medication, improvement in handwriting can be dramatic. In fact, improvement is often noted immediately

ADHD–A Family Matter

One in every four children with ADHD has a biological parent who is similarly affected according to Dr. A.J. Zametkin of the National Institutes of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland. His excellent review of the family history of attention deficit disorder appeared several years ago in The Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Zametkin discussed a family in which 3 generations of males had significant symptoms of ADHD.
The youngest was diagnosed first and treated successfully with medication. On review, it was obvious that his father had attention and organization dysfunctions which continued to interfere with his life as an adult. He was also treated successfully with medication beginning in his forties. Further questioning suggested strongly that the paternal grandfather had symptoms of ADHD. (Zametkin A, JAMA 273:1871-1874, 1995)

Editor’s Note: This study, although from several years ago, points out the importance of discussing the family history when evaluating a child with attention problems or learning disabilities. Strong family patterns do exist. And this is not the first time a parent has learned of his or her own attention deficit after having had a child evaluated.


Over the decade and a half since this study was published, research into the cause of ADHD has shown that heredity is the most dominant factor determining the presence of ADHD. Those of us working with children with ADHD often see families in which the one or both parents will say, “You know when I was a child I was just like my son. I had the same problems. In fact I still have those problems to some degree.”

ADHD and Anxiety

Children of all ages with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) frequently suffer from varying degrees of anxiety. Anxiety may be provoked for many reasons in the child with ADHD: The frustration coming from having to work harder in order to keep up academically is a common and significant stressor. The incessant negative feedback that is all too common in the life of the child with ADHD creates a numbing pressure. Then the difficultly getting along with peers sets the child a part socially and fosters a sense of not belonging. All of these issues lead to low self-esteem which makes the child with ADHD even more vulnerable to stress.

A study reported recently at the American Neuropsychiatric Association meeting found that stimulants administered for ADHD also help relieve anxiety in the patients. In fact stimulants alone were as effective in treating anxiety as stimulant plus anti-psychotic medication.

The study evaluated 134 children and teens with a mean age of ten years. They were evaluated in terms of the change over time in anxiety scores on the parent-completed Child Behavior Checklist.

Eighty children were on stimulants only. Another 54 were on a stimulant plus antipsychotic drug. Twenty four of the patients had clinically significant anxiety, as determined by a baseline Achenbach anxiety score prior to starting medication. After four months of therapy with stimulant medication, 83% of the children had a reduction in their anxiety scores.

This study did not evaluate the reasons why anxiety was lessened with stimulant treatment. Two possible mechanisms, however, could be responsible. First, it is possible that stimulants have a direct anti-anxiety effect when used to treat ADHD. However, this is not proven. A more likely possibility is that with effective treatment of the ADHD behaviors, the patients experienced less conflict with his or her environment and, therefore, experienced a reduction in anxiety.

Those of us working with children with ADHD should remember that they are often dealing with significant stress and anxiety. We need to look for such complications and address them when needed. It is good to know that effective stimulant therapy, itself, has a measurable anti-anxiety effect.

The ADHD Child and Summer Camp

It is that time of year! Millions of kids across the country will be packing up their knapsacks, waving goodbye to mom and dad, and heading for the hills—literally. Yes, they will be off to summer camp.

What about camp for your ADHD child? Is camp good for him? Is she ready for camp? These are good questions. The answer, of course depends on a multitude of factors. The issues condense to two important areas:

Is your child With ADHD ready for camp?

Is camp ready for your child with ADHD?

Let’s look at the second question first. This question is really asking if the camp under consideration is one that is appropriate for a child with ADHD. Does the camp have a philosophy of inclusion in which they are interested and equipped to work with children with varying backgrounds and needs? Does the administration and staff have some knowledge about ADHD? Is the staff trained in the needed skills of reinforcement and behavioral management? If your child is taking medication, is the camp able to administer it properly.

Although few in number, camps for children with ADHD and/or other learning difficulties does exist. These camps are designed to present a general camping experience for the child while at the same time providing specific therapy and education relating to the ADHD. To find out about such camps in your area you might check with the local chapter of CH.A.D.D. or LDA (Leaning Disabilities Association). If you are unable to locate a local chapter, contact the national offices of these organizations.  Also, check with your school counselor. He or she might have a list of specialty summer camps.

Is your child ready for camp? The answer to this question is somewhat more complicated. Most importantly, the child’s attention deficit should be sufficiently controlled so that he will have a positive and helpful experience. His behavior should be at the point that undue re-direction or behavior modification will not be required.

While there is no sure way to know, there are a few points that indicate that your child is ready for the camp experience. Look for the following readiness cues: Does your child make friends easily? Does she adapt well to new situations? Does he respond well to adult supervision? Does she enjoy successful sleep-overs at the homes of her friends or relatives?”

If your child hasn’t experienced success in most of these areas, she or he probably is not ready for sleep-away camp. But she might be ready for a less socially demanding experience such as day camp. If day camp is too big a step, encourage your child to spend a few days with a favorite friend or relative. Then be sure to praise her success at being away from home.

In general, I would suggest that most children with ADHD are not ready for a week-long sleep away camp until ten or older. For many, this time will not come until their early teens. Of course there could be exceptions with the more mature child. Day camp could be a very good alternative for the child with ADHD.

What Are the Benefits of Camp?

Attending camp gives children an opportunity to learn many new skills—how to swim, ride a horse, sail a boat, hit a tennis ball, use a bow and arrow, tie a knot. It also gives them a chance to master important emotional, developmental, and social skills—how to get along with other people, establish peer relationships, tolerate differences, work as a team, and become more independent.  Camp also gives parents and kids a chance to practice the art of letting go. The experience lets children develop autonomy and a sense of self-respect. A successful camp experience can be a big boost to self-esteem. For parents, the separation allows them to take a break, care for some of their own needs, and recharge their parenting batteries. They also need to experience autonomy from their child—in preparation for what is to come in the very near future.

How To Prepare the Child for Camp?

Since children can be fearful of the unknown, it is a good idea to share as much information as possible about the camp. If the facility is within driving distance, you might plan a visit ahead of time. Such a visit allows the child to see the place as well as talk with some of the staff. Much of the mystique as well as the fear is thus removed.

If a personal visit is not possible, ask the camp for whatever information they may have: brochures, pictures, videos of the camp.

Above all, talk with the child about his hopes, dreams, and fears about camp. Listen to what he has to say. Discuss any concerns. Certainly, do not belittle the worries and fears. Let the child know that while you think the camp experience will be good for all of you, you will miss him and will look forward to his return. It also helps if the child is able to attend camp with a friend.

Non-Stimulant Medication Approved for Treatment of ADHD

The FDA has approved a new medication for the treatment of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). Kapvay is the first non-stimulant approved to treat ADHD in children and adolescents. It can be used either with or one of the traditional stimulant medications or can be used alone in the treatment of ADHD.

Clonidine extended-release tablets (Kapvay) acts on the brain in a different way, and acts in a different part of the brain, than the stimulants. Taken twice a day, Clonidine, in these early studies, improved core ADHD symptoms. In clinical trials, the most common adverse effects were sleepiness and sedation.

We will need more experience with this medication in order to know its long term usefulness. Clonidine in its original form has been around for years. It is used primarily in adults as a treatment for high blood pressure. This older form has been used off label by some psychiatrists to treat oppositional behavior and certain types of sleep problems in children with ADHD.

Most likely, the primarily use of Kapvay will be as an adjunct medication used along with stimulants when the involved child has more impulsive behavior and or/has sleep problems. Those of us treating children with ADHD are pleased to have an additional option available in the management of children with various forms of ADHD.

The Power of Positive Relationships

Our chance of success in parenting is greatly increased as we positively meet the normal, healthy needs of our children for love, acceptance, meaning, and mastery. As these needs are met our children will be less tempted to seek a place for themselves through deviant, undesirable behavior.

Our children need to know that we love them in spite of what they do. Our love and concern as parents is not conditioned on their behavior. By honestly accepting our children and liking them while not necessarily accepting or liking their behavior, we keep the door open to change and growth. Love is, and has always been, the most powerful force in the world.

When it comes to relating to children, patience is a virtue but is not always easy to express.

“Stop acting like a child,” I overhead one frustrated mother say to her six-year-old. Although I could understand why this mother erupted in such frustration in the middle of the supermarket, her remark mirrors our frequent inappropriate expectations of our children. Much of the behavior of children that is so frustrating to us as adults is simply our children being, well, children.

To be effective as parents, we need to have some idea of what is appropriate behavior for our children’s age and stage of development and not attack them for things they cannot help. A young father got very angry with his three-year-old son for using a paper cup as a football during a formal reception. Actually this was pretty normal behavior for a toddler who was ignored in the midst of all the adult activity.

Another mother was frustrated because her thirteen-year-old daughter ran to her room  slamming the door when her mother disapproved of the dress she was wearing. Actually, such pouting and anger are quite typical of the adolescent. We need to remember that children are uniquely children —growing organisms who have not yet reached perfection. Punishment of the child for things he or she cannot help or does not understand will only create frustration, confusion and, likely, rebellion.

We often use up so much energy nagging and correcting our children that we have little energy left to relate to them in positive ways. This is particularly true with ADHD children. In the happy families I have known, however, the interactions have a positive tone and direction. In angry, unhappy families, most interactions have a negative tone. This is one area where all of us as parents can work toward a better record. We can tip the balance in our families in a more positive direction by applying some of the following principles to our relationships:

Listen to the child. Listen without interrupting or correcting. Listen to just hear what he or she has to say.

Do something the child likes. For some this may be reading and talking, others playing touch football, others working on a craft project, or repairing the car.

Give the child some space. Let the child do his or her own thing as long as the activity does not infringe on the rights of others. We are saying, in essence, “I trust you to make some choices for yourself about what you will do with your time.”

Avoid conflict when possible. Conflict, at times and to some degree, is inevitable. While most parents seek to avoid conflict, some seem to delight in having a head on collision with their children. However, both parents and children gain when potential conflict is avoided. A power struggle only creates hostility and negative feelings which hurt everyone. When you do need to draw the line and establish a limit, do so firmly and quickly with as little verbal combat as possible.

Look for the child’s good points. Everyone has some gift. Everyone does something well. Everyone has some redeeming features. The sparkle is there if we only look for it. Ours will be a much happier family if we look for each other’s talents rather than each other’s faults.

We set limits firmly and consistently but without anger. Even as we seek to understand our child, we remember we are the parent. We need to let our child know clearly what our expectations are. If the line between expected and inappropriate behavior is blurred, the child tends to push until they have some sense of where the line is.

As parents we teach through relationships. We show our children what love is by loving. We teach forgiveness by forgiving. We teach honesty by being honest. We cannot substitute things for affection. Often adults have been heard to say, “I received everything I needed form my parents except the love and understanding I needed most.”

The child with ADHD draws criticism and negative feedback like a magnet. Relationships in the family often mushroom into a back hole of negativism. Parents find themselves constantly correcting, redirecting, and limiting. The child too often responds in sullenness and more self-defeating behavior. It takes effort to reorient the family atmosphere to a more positive spin. But it can be done.

Structure of Time and Place

Most children as well as adults, when left on their own, eventually will fit their daily routine into some sort of pattern that allows them to function successfully. Due to their internal disorganization, however, children with ADHD fail to do this effectively. They have difficulty focusing on a goal and aiming at it. Their increased susceptibility to distractions makes it difficult for them to stay focused on what is important at any given time.

The more unstructured, disorganized and distracting the environment, the more the child is disorganized and disoriented as to his goals. This, in turn, leads to confusion and frustration which leads to more disorganized, unsuccessful behavior. Thus in an unstructured, unregulated environment the child is caught up in a spiraling web of deteriorating behavior. The more inconsistent and unpredictable the environment, the more disorganized the child’s behavior becomes. This then induces more disorganization and inconsistency in his environment. The downward spiral of confusion and frustration goes on and on…and on.

An environment that calms, organizes, and structures the child’s life is one of the primary steps in a strategy for success. The following techniques are basic:

1. The first step is to provide a dependable time structure to the child’s day. Some elements

of this are:

a. Getting up the same time every day.

b. Regular daily schedule.

c. Regular routine for school, play naps, etc.

d. Regular time for homework.

e. Regular bedtime.

Such a regular, dependable routine does several things for the child. Each planned activity presents him or her a framework on which he can hang his day. The set routine gives him short‑term goals to work towards. The time structure acts like handrails on the stairs which help the child keep his behavior more goal-directed. Having certain activities to do at specific times makes him less likely to wander off into distracting, bothersome behavior.

In implementing such a time structure, the parent first decides on what would be a desirable daily pattern that fits the parents, as well as the child’s, needs. At this point, it would be helpful to sketch out the daily schedule. The parents need to make sure the key elements (getting up, meals, school, bed time) are such that they can enforce them consistently. They then discuss the schedule with the child.

The parents do not have to make a big production out of this scheduling task. They might simply say something like this: “This is going to be our schedule. Let’s discuss it.” If the child is old enough, the schedule can be written and posted in his room or some other conspicuous place. An older child (seven or eight or older) might participate in determining the contents of the schedule. Once the schedule has been determined, the parent enforces it consistently, but gently.

This does not mean that the family must live a totally monotonous, unchanging life for the sake of this one child. But the day‑to‑day routine of the child should be as consistent as possible within the family’s power to make it so. Certainly, there will be times when a break in the routine is needed. When change in this regular routine is necessary, however, it helps to prepare the child ahead of time and clearly state what you expect of him or her.

2. The next step is the structure of place.

“A place for everything and everything in its place,” is more than a motto for the person with ADHD. It is a necessity. A search for a lost baseball glove can be a frustrating experience for a normal ten‑year‑old. But for a ten-year-old with ADHD, it can be a disaster, ending in an emotional explosion. Such problems can be prevented by helping the child organize his world (at least his room and his belongings) so that there is a place for everything.

This could involve other elements such as:

a. A regular, non‑distracting, place to do homework.

b. Labels on drawers and shelves to help the child locate the contents. (Some parents have successfully used color codes on drawers and shelves.)

c. In strange new surroundings, such as on vacation, new school, or visiting friends, it helps to take the child on a tour and show him the layout and locations of important particulars of the area.

These are simple steps but can make a big difference in the life of the child with ADHD—and that of his parents.

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