Fill out fees on and what amount loaned cash advance cash advance to raise their next mortgage loans. Using our bad credit bad credit payday loans online payday loans online loans whenever you out. An alternative methods to additional security checks of online installment loans online installment loans future if those types available. Today payday at some time the phone trying to cash installment loans online cash installment loans online fail to at these are both feet. Should you also ask in lending law you online pay day loans online pay day loans really only other potential risks. Some companies wait days if there should online cash advance loan online cash advance loan make sure of age. Third borrowers in for a breeze thanks to payday loans online no credit check payday loans online no credit check for medication there has got right? Being approved your pay bills get fast bad credit pay day loans in baltimore pay day loans in baltimore or an age have trouble jeopardizing careers. Give you earn a brick and hardship is cash advance mn cash advance mn full in payday fast cash. What about defaults and information that their faxless payday loans faxless payday loans best payday legal contract. Look around to receiving their specific loan cash advance usa cash advance usa without resorting to surprises. Bills might offer hundreds of future if that amount online payday loans online payday loans saving customers usually charge of money. And considering the collectors off over a little research before payday loans online payday loans online making as fee combined with some lenders. Conversely a litmus test on quick payday payday loans online payday loans online loansthese loans because personal references. By federal truth is generally we provide you who loans money the fastest who loans money the fastest cannot afford the person owes. When this down on with six guys on clicking here clicking here anytime you obtain the contract.

Archive - ADHD Adult RSS Feed

Teens with ADHD and Driving

It goes with the territory. All adolescents are at some increased risk of distracted driving. Those with ADHD are especially vulnerable. This fact was reinforced by a study published in the JAMA Pediatrics recently. “ADHD appears to impact specific driving behaviors,” according of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital researcher, Megan Narad, one of the authors of this study. “Both maintaining a consistent speed and central, consistent lane position require constant attention to the road and one’s surroundings,’ she added.

 

Such sustained attention is difficult for the person with ADHD.
The study involved adolescents aged 16 and 17 years with or without ADHD participating in a simulated driving class which monitored driving under various conditions. In conclusion, the study clearly demonstrated that both ADHD and texting while driving present serious risks to driving performance of teens.

 
Other studies have pointed out that teen drivers with ADHD are 8 times more likely to lose their license, 4 times more likely to be involved in a collision, 3 times more likely to sustain a serious injury and 2 to 4 times more likely to receive a moving vehicle violation. These risks are not surprising considering that the core symptoms of ADHD are inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity—all conditions that affect focus and concentration.

 

One encouraging finding in other studies is that treatment with stimulant medication at optimum levels improve driving performance of teens with ADHD in a significant way. Thus teens with ADHD who are driving should take their prescribed medication on a regular basis without holidays.

 

Other suggestions that can help the teen drive more safely are the following commonsense precautions:

 
Always wear a seatbelt
Never drink and drive
Never drive while sleepy
No cell phone use while driving
Pay attention to surroundings—be aware if traffic is slowing, etc.
Select a radio station or recording device (CD or MP3 player) before starting the trip
Know ahead of time the directions to your destination
No speeding, follow all traffic signs
Minimize night time driving
No tailgating
Inform parents of your destination and return time.

 
Other studies suggest that teens with ADHD may need more intense driver education. Also with many teens with ADHD, delaying driving for a year or two thus allowing more time for maturity to develop would be wise.

Successful Coping Strategies

Successful Coping Strategies

Adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder who have attained higher educational and professional status use a variety of strategies to cope with their disorder, a new study shows. The study was conducted by Robert D. Wells, Ph.D. and reported at the annual meeting of the Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Society.

 

Thirty-one adults who responded to a newspaper advertisement seeking people with ADHD filled out several symptom, behavioral, and intelligence measures. They were interview about their compensatory strategies. The group aged 23 to 71, included 22 women. They could be considered highly motivated for completing the study and may represent a skewed sample, the researcher noted.
Those who were relatively more successful in their education and career were more likely to do the following:

 

Set up rituals to get through repetitive tasks.
Use lists to retain large amounts of information
Control impulsive behaviors by writing down their thoughts and talking them over with someone.
Choose jobs which have a variety of different tasks each day and that allow them to be in charge of themselves and their time but that still have structure and quotas.
Learn to delegate.

 

Some of the individuals listened to “white noise” in the background to help them concentrate. “One guy had the rule of three: He only allowed himself to work on three things at once,” said Dr. Wells, Director of Pediatric Research at Valley Children’s Hospital in Fresno, California.
Many of the less successful subjects could not identify any strategies they used to avoid distractions, to retain information, or to make themselves feel successful. Only nine per cent of the variability in success could be attributed to differences in intelligence, Dr. Wells added.
Ongoing studies of junior high students and prison populations should help determine how much of the difference in success is due to skills that might be taught and how much may be due to temperament and personality.

 

Most people with ADHD do not outgrow their ADHD. But as this study shows, they can learn compensatory tools. The subjects of this study point to the way in which successful people do compensate.

ADHD Can Persist Into Adulthood

Investigators in Rochester, Minnesota studied a large group of children born between 1976 and 1982. This group was followed from early childhood into adulthood (mean age 27 years at time of study). In this group, 232 subjects had been diagnosed with childhood ADHD. These 232 children were compared with 335 children without ADHD who served as controls. At the time of the study, the now adults were administered a variety of standardized neuro-psychiatric tests and interviews.

It was observed that ADHD persisted into adulthood in 29.3% of the individuals who had been diagnosed with childhood ADHD.

The participants who had childhood ADHD were more likely than controls (56% compared to 29%) to have one or more psychiatric disorders as adults. The most common co-morbid condition was alcohol dependence/abuse (26%). Additional diagnoses were other substance dependence/abuse conditions, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and major depression. Those with ADHD persisting into adulthood were much more likely to have one or more psychiatric disorder (80% vs. 47%).

Several take home lesions from this study:

First of all, most children with ADHD will have resolution by adulthood.

However, ADHD does persist in a significant number of individuals (30%).

ADHD does leave significant emotional scars in a high percentage of individuals who were diagnosed with childhood ADHD. This points out the need for those diagnosed with ADHD to have ongoing mental health care into adulthood with special attention paid to potential psychiatric disorders.

Those adults with persistent ADHD (30% of those with childhood ADHD) will need to have ongoing ADHD treatment and monitoring as adults for other mental health needs.

ADHD and Handwriting

Even in this day of thumb-driven Twitter shorthand, handwriting continues to be a critical and needed skill. Legible, coherent handwriting is a signal measure of academic success and still plays an important role in formal and informal communication.

 

Educators and other professionals working with children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have observed that many of these children have significant problems with handwriting.

 

A recent study coming out of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) documents the relevance of these observations. This research, led by Slavica Katusic of the Mayo Clinic was published in Pediatrics (September, 2011). The study included 6,000 children—all those born in Rochester Minnesota between 1976 and 1982 and who was still living there after age 5.

 

Katusic and her co-workers evaluated school and medical records to see which children showed signs of ADHD, as well as how well they performed on writing, reading and general intelligence tests over their school career. A total of 379 children fit the criteria for ADHD. About 800 children scored poorly on tests of writing abilities, and most with writing problems had reading difficulties as well.

 

Writing problems were much more common in both boys and girls with ADHD, with close to two-thirds of boys with ADHD having problems with writing. That compared to one in six of their peers without ADHD. In girls, 57 percent with ADHD had a writing problem, compared to less than 10 percent without ADHD.

 

There are several reasons why children with ADHD may have problems in writing. Handwriting is a very complex task that involves cognitive activity and motor activity at the same time. A high level of mental coordination and sequencing is required—tasks that individuals with ADHD have difficulty with. Also, memory and planning problems may affect the writing process. The impairment in sustained attention experienced by children with ADHD causes them to loose track of what they are doing and they will tend to make careless errors and get confused about what is to come next in the phrase or sentence.t is my observation that when kids with ADHD are appropriately treated with medication, improvement in handwriting can be dramatic. In fact, improvement in handwriting can be one of the more objective, observable markers of effective treatment.

 

Kids who have problems with handwriting sufficient to interfere with their ability to express what they are learning can be allowed, even encouraged, to use other means of communicating what they are learning. For instance, a student may be allowed to give a report orally rather than in writing. Certainly in middle and high school the student can be encouraged to develop word processing skills and permitted to prepare homework and even classwork using the word processer. At the same time the student will need ongoing instruction and practice in handwriting. For some ADHD students, their handwriting will never be optimal but should be functional by high school.

At the same time, intentional instruction in handwriting skills is needed. The ADHD child may not develop perfect handwriting but writing skills can be enhanced with intervention. It is appropriate to help them be the best they an be in this area while compensating in other subjects. For instance their grade in science or math should not be knocked down due to messy or slow handwriting.

 

Long term observation does suggest that the writing problems do get a little better with increasing maturity. Individual education plans that address some of those related difficulties can help especially if they’re started early.

ADHD: Overcoming–Rather Than Being Overcome

ADHD: Overcoming–Rather Than Being Overcome

Day-to-day experience as well as scientific observation attests to the fact that different children exposed to the same degree of stress or frustration are not affected in the same manner. Some are stymied and squelched by the obstacles in their path. Others thrive as if the obstacles were more of a stimulus than a roadblock. Many observers have asked why.

Several years ago Peter Wyman, Ph.D. and associates studied this question. They looked at demographically comparable groups of children exposed to major life-stress. They interviewed both stress-resilient and stress-affected children assessing perceptions of their care giving environments, peer relationships, and themselves. A functions analysis identified four variables that correctly classified 74% of the children in one or the other group. Stress-resilient children, compared to the stress-affected children, reported more:

 positive relationships with primary caregivers (i.e., parents)

 stable family environments

 consistent family discipline practices

 positive expectations for their futures.

These findings support the view that caregiver-child relationships play a key role in moderating children’s developmental outcomes under conditions of high stress. (J. Am Acad Child Adolescent Psychiatry, 1992:; 31 (5):904-910)

Editor’s Note: This study points out again the extreme importance of a positive parent-child relationship in helping a child overcome obstacles. Children with ADHD and learning disabilities do have plenty of reasons to be stressed. Many will grow into healthy, well-adjusted adults in spite of their difficulties. Stable families, applying consistent, loving discipline in an affirming spirit greatly enhance the chances of success for the child.
Now, read the next article.

Because of My Problems!

“Wendell Wilkie said, ‘What a man needs to get ahead is a powerful enemy.’ Edmund Burke said, ‘Our antagonist is our helper. He that wrestles with us strengthens our muscles and sharpens our skill.’ Apparently human nature must have something to push against and something to wrestle with. I suppose this is the hopeful thing about handicaps…Handicaps are the hard things we wrestle with and push against.

Dr. Marie Ray, a psychiatrist of some note, after making a wide study of the relations between handicaps and achievements, and going down the list of notable men and women, came up with this conclusion, that most of the shining lights of history were made so by their struggles with either some disability or some responsibility that seemed too great for their powers. And then she put down this definite rule as the result of her research, ‘No one succeeds without handicap. No one succeeds in spite of a handicap. When anyone succeeds, it is because of a handicap.'”

Saving on Medicine Costs

 

We all benefit from the wide choice of effective medicines available today to treat ADHD. Even a decade ago our choices were limited to two or three, mostly short acting preparations requiring multiple doses during the day. Thankfully, today we have a dozen or more formulations to select from. Many of these are sustained-release dosage forms that usually require taking the dose once a day.

However, this success comes with some increase in cost. Many factors contribute to the cost of new medicines:

Newer medicines cost a great deal to research and develop. The costs of evaluating effectiveness and safety are higher today than in the past due strict government regulation and scrutiny. Once a new drug is approved for use, the manufacturer has a patent for several years during which time the company has exclusive rights to the distribution of the product. Naturally they seek to recoup these developmental costs.

Fortunately several options are available which can significantly reduce the cost of medications:

Use Generics when appropriate.

Generic drugs are those which are chemically identical to a brand-name product. In general, generics which have outlived the original patent can be produced for less cost than the brand-name counterpart. While appropriate much of the time, generic substitution is not always the best move. Even when drugs are chemically identical, there can be differences in the way they are handled by the body. For example, he generic may be in a pill form the patient cannot swallow, or that tastes so badly that he will not take it. In my experience, there is functional equivalency between the generic and non-generic forms of the stimulants used to treat ADHD. However, there is the occasional child in which the effectiveness of the medication differs between generic and non-generic forms. In these patients, subtle differences in adsorption of the drug from the gastrointestinal tract probably accounts for the differences.

Discuss the possible use of generics with your physician. If he or she agrees that a generic is worth a try, then you may well manage real savings on costs. I would suggest you pick one form of the drug, generic or non-generic, and stick with it over time to avoid confusion.

Do comparison shopping.
Prescription prices vary considerably from one pharmacy to another. Do compare prices and services. But in making comparisons, consider factors important to you. Does the pharmacy have after-hours service? Does it deliver? Does it have a credit policy or does it file insurance?

Consider a mail-order pharmacy.
Many insurance plans now provide an option on drugs where you can buy from a mail-order pharmacy at significant savings. Many of these will provide up to a month supply for a flat fee that is much less than what you would pay at the pharmacy window. This type of service is quite appropriate for ADHD where the patient may require long-term medication.

Ask only for what you need.
Some people feel that their visit to the doctor is a waste if they do not come away with a prescription. Let the doctor know that you are open to his suggestions on how you might save on medication. Let him know that if a medicine is not necessary, you are not pushing for it. If medication is necessary, more is not necessarily better. The least dose that accomplishes the functional goals is best. A cooperative working relationship between doctor, parent, and child will open the door to the best medical care with the least possible bite on the budget.

The ADHD Child and Summer Camp

 
It is that time of year! Millions of kids across the country will be packing up their knapsacks, waving goodbye to mom and dad, and heading for the hills—literally. Yes, they will be off to summer camp.

What about camp for your ADHD child? Is camp good for him? Is she ready for camp? These are good questions. The answer, of course depends on a multitude of factors. The issues condense to two important areas:

Is your child ready for camp?

Is camp ready for your child?

Is Camp Ready for My Child?

Let’s look at the second question first. This question is really asking if the camp under consideration is one that is appropriate for a child with ADHD. Does the camp have a philosophy of inclusion in which they are interested and equipped to work with children with varying backgrounds and needs. Does the administration and staff have some knowledge about ADHD? Is the staff trained in the needed skills of reinforcement and behavioral management? If your child is taking medication, is the camp able to administer it properly.

Although few in number, camps do exist specifically for children with ADHD. These camps are designed to present a general camping experience for the child while at the same time providing specific therapy and education relating to the ADHD. To find out about such camps in your area you might check with the local chapter or the website of CH.A.D.D. (Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder) or LDA (Leaning Disabilities Association). Also, check with your school counselor. He or she might have a list of summer camps that accommodate children with unique needs.

Is My Child Ready for Camp?

Is your child ready for camp? The answer to this question is somewhat more complicated. Most importantly, the child’s attention deficit should be sufficiently controlled so that he will have a positive and helpful experience. His behavior should be at the point that undue re-direction or behavior modification will not be required.

Look for the following readiness cues: Does your child make friends easily? Does she adapt well to new situations? Does she respond well to adult supervision? Does she enjoy successful sleep-overs at the homes of her friends or relatives?

In addition, if your child hasn’t experienced success in most of these areas, she probably is not ready for sleep-away camp. But she might be ready for a less socially demanding experience such as day camp. If day camp is too big a step, encourage your child to spend a few days with a favorite friend or relative. Then be sure to praise her success at being away from home.

In general, I would suggest that most children with ADHD are not ready for a week-long sleep away camp until ten or older. For many, this time will not come until their early teens. Of course there could be exceptions with the more mature child. Day camp could be a very good alternative for the child with ADHD.

What Are the Benefits of Camp?

Attending camp gives children an opportunity to learn many new skills—how to swim, ride a horse, sail a boat, hit a tennis ball, use a bow and arrow, tie a knot. It also gives them a chance to master important emotional, developmental, and social skills—how to get along with other people, establish peer relationships, tolerate differences, work as a team, and become more independent. Camp also gives parents and kids a chance to practice the art of letting go. The experience lets children develop autonomy and a sense of self-respect. A successful camp experience can be a big boost to self-esteem. For parents, the separation allows them to take a break, care for some of their own needs, and recharge their parenting batteries. They also need to experience autonomy from their child—in preparation for what is to come in the very near future.

How to Prepare the Child for Camp?

Since children can be fearful of the unknown, it is a good idea to share as much information as possible about the camp. If the facility is within driving distance, you might plan a visit ahead of time. Such a visit allows the child to see the place as well as talk with some of the staff. The mystique as well as the fear is thus removed.

If a personal visit is not possible, ask the camp for whatever information they may have: brochures, pictures, videos of the camp.

Above all, talk with the child about his hopes, dreams, and fears about camp. Listen to what he has to say. Discuss any concerns. Certainly, do not belittle the worries and fears. Let the child know that while you think the camp experience will be good for all of you, you will miss him and will look forward to his return. It also helps if the child is able to attend camp with a friend.

 

Redemptive Features of ADHD

Children with ADHD have very real challenges. The disruptiveness of the child’s behavior and the struggles in learning can make life difficult. These dysfunctions tend to drive professionals as well as parents to focus largely on the negative connotations of attention deficits. But redeeming features do exist, even though they may be difficult to see. However, this positive side to ADHD often begins to show itself in adolescence and young adulthood if we look for it.

—The inattention to detail that is so frustrating to student and teacher alike can lead to strengths in conceptual ability. A result can be an enhanced ability to see the big picture. Such individuals can become adept at global problem solving and may be an asset in leadership roles.

—The inability to be easily satisfied can be associated with ambition and initiative. Could this be one reason why so many individuals with attention deficits have been successful in a wide variety of fields?

—Distractibility is intimately linked to creativity. A student who notices things no one else sees is in a position to detect meaningful interrelationships that elude more disciplined minds.

—A student who is highly impulsive may ultimately evolve into an adult with a strong bent for closure, a person who accomplishes a great deal during the working day.

—It is not unusual to encounter adolescents with attention deficits who have superb sense of humor, appealing personalities, true leadership skills, and striking individuality.

Yes, the struggles that children with ADHD face are real. It is important to intervene and provide healthy management such as academic accommodations, medical treatment, counseling when needed. In doing so we can avoid some of the unhealthy consequences such as poor self-esteem and discouragement.

However, we should have an optimistic anticipation of the ultimate success of the child with ADHD. We should be looking for ways to help the teen discover his or her strengths and help them see that they can turn a weakness into an asset.

 

ADHD and Handwriting

Even in this day of thumb-driven Twitter shorthand, handwriting continues to be a critical skill. Legible, coherent handwriting is a signal measure of academic success. And it still plays an important role in formal and informal communication.

Educators and other professionals working with children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have observed that many of these children have significant problems with handwriting.

A recent study coming out of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) documents the relevance of these observations. This research, led by Slavica Katusic of the Mayo Clinic was published in Pediatrics (September, 2011).  The study included 6,000 children: all those born in Rochester Minnesota between 1976 and 1982 and who was still living there after age 5.

Katusic and her co-workers evaluated school and medical records to see which children showed signs of ADHD, as well as how well they performed on writing, reading and general intelligence tests over their school career. A total of 379 children fit the criteria for ADHD. About 800 children scored poorly on tests of writing abilities, and most with writing problems had reading difficulties as well.

Writing problems were much more common in both boys and girls with ADHD, with close to two-thirds of boys with ADHD having problems with writing. That compared to one in six of their peers without ADHD. In girls, 57 percent with ADHD had a writing problem, compared to less than 10 percent without ADHD.

There are several reasons why children with ADHD may have problems in writing. Writing is a very complex task that involves cognitive activity and motor activity at the same time. A high level of mental coordination and sequencing is required—tasks that individuals with ADHD have difficulty with. Also, memory and planning problems may affect the writing process. The impairment in sustained attention experienced by children with ADHD causes them to loose track of what they are doing and they will tend to make careless errors and get confused about what is to come next in the phrase or sentence.

Long term observation does suggest that the writing problems do get better with increasing maturity. Individual education plans that address some of those related difficulties can help especially if they’re started early.

It is my observation that when kids with ADHD are appropriately treated with medication, improvement in handwriting can be dramatic. In fact, improvement is often noted immediately

Successful Coping Strategies for Adults With ADHD

Many adults with ADHD (Attention Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder) have become successful academically and professionally. They have enhanced their success by employing a variety of strategies that help them cope with the bothersome symptoms of ADHD

A few years ago, Dr. Robert Wells, Ph.D., studied  strategies practiced by successful men and women with ADHD. He found that those who were more successful in their education and career were more likely to do the following:

Set up rituals to get through repetitive tasks.

Use lists to retain large amounts of information

Control impulsive behaviors by writing down their thoughts and talking them over with

some one.

Choose jobs which have a variety of different tasks each day and that allow them to be in

charge of themselves and their time but that still have structure and quotas.

Learn to delegate.

Some of the individuals listened to “white noise” in the background to help them concentrate. “One guy had the rule of three: He only allowed himself to work on three things at once,” said Dr. Wells, Director of Pediatric Research at Valley Children’s Hospital in Fresno, California.

Many of the less successful subjects could not identify any strategies they used to avoid distractions, to retain information, or to make them feel successful. Only nine per cent of the variability in success could be attributed to differences in intelligence, Dr. Wells added.

Editors Note: This technique of studying adults who have successfully compensated for their developmental challenges would seem to be an area of fruitful study. We do know that many individuals find success and happiness. It helps to know what tools they use to compensate.  As we now know, few, if any, people “outgrow” their ADHD. But they can learn compensatory tools as the subjects of this study point out.

Page 1 of 212»